photo by Konstantinov S.A. (Skonstantinov09 on Wikipedia Commons)

Russian scientists have succeeded in regenerating an ice age plant from fruit tissue found frozen in the Siberian permafrost.

A nest of Arctic squirrels containing fruit and seeds was discovered over 30 meters (100ft) underground, its contents frozen for around 32,000 years.

Scientists managed to germinate an ice-age plant, similar to chickweed, from the ancient seeds.

 

From the Guardian:

The experiment proves that permafrost serves as a natural depository for ancient life forms, said the Russian researchers, who published their findings in Tuesday’s issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States.

The burrows explored by the Russian scientists are located in layers of permafrost which also contain the remains of wooly mammoths and rhinoceros, as well as ancient bison, horses and deer.

Canadian paleontologist Grant Zazula is quoted in a report by CBC:

The permafrost across the Arctic is this treasure trove of ancient life, and not just extinct ancient life that we think of as fossils, but also viable ancient life that, given the right circumstances, can come back to life.

About The Author: Graham Land

Greenfudge editor and London-based writer Graham Land grew up in the suburbs of Washington, DC, where he was part of the local hardcore punk scene, playing in several bands. Through this musical movement he became involved in grass roots interests such as anti-racist activism, animal rights and Ecology. In 2000 he relocated to Europe, eventually earning an MA from Malmö University in Sweden. He has also lived in Japan, Ireland, Portugal and Greece.



FROM OUR DIRECTORY

Your business here?

Climate Central

No Photo Available

Friendsofwater.com

Photo of Friendsofwater.com

WSPA International

No Photo Available

Shangri-La Organic Spa & Retreat - A Green Body & Mind Detoxification & Healing Center

No Photo Available