photo by randomtruth (Flickr CC)

Southern California is a strange place. It is the global center for popular culture; film, television, music, media, etc.

But there are wild animals roaming Hollywood Blvd at night.

Coyotes – these native North American canine predators hunt in the suburbs of Southern California. The same places where residents with manicured lawns raise families and keep pet cats and dogs.

Sometimes coyotes eat cats and dogs. Sometimes they even attack small children.

So it’s understandable that some California residents would like to exterminate coyotes, rather than risk attacks on their families and pets. Even though its human garbage and pet food that is most likely attracting the coyotes into residential neighborhoods. And let’s face it – they were there first.

But one California community, the city of Calabasas, has chosen a different method of dealing with Coyotes than hunting or otherwise exterminating them. Calabasas has decided to leave them alone.

It’s a sharp shift from the aggressive tactics that have been used for years in Southern California’s hillside communities, where authorities wage battle against the opportunistic coyotes that stray into neighborhoods looking for food, often in the form of pet cats and small dogs.

Read more on Calabasas’ coyote problem and solution in the Los Angeles Times.

About The Author: Graham Land

Greenfudge editor and London-based writer Graham Land grew up in the suburbs of Washington, DC, where he was part of the local hardcore punk scene, playing in several bands. Through this musical movement he became involved in grass roots interests such as anti-racist activism, animal rights and Ecology. In 2000 he relocated to Europe, eventually earning an MA from Malmö University in Sweden. He has also lived in Japan, Ireland, Portugal and Greece.



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